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What is YOUR definition of - "old skool"
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Posted on Tue, Jun 28, 2005 23:24

Old School? I was at a biker rally this past weekend where they had a poker run for charity, and among the shiny new Fatboys and baggers, 1 gentleman stood out. He rode a Panhead (no idea what vintage, I don't know Harley's very well) and showed up wearing a black leather jacket(which had long ago stopped being black and was more like light gray to match his hair) and tattered chaps with a WW2 German infantry helmet and nothing else but a roled up sleeping bag and a leather roll-up pouch full of tools strapped to his sissy bar. He had a pair of those old leather aviator goggles on and he immediately reminded me of something straight out of Easyrider, except he was much more dirty and road weary looking, which was understandable considering the pouring rain. He had a handlebar moustache of pure white, which, when he pulled it out from under his chinstrap, hung almost to his chest. He was tall and thin and had a smile of crooked teeth that never left his face the whole weekend. His bike shook and rattled and the tail pipe swept up and ended in a flattened out trumpet about 2ft above the seat beside the sissy bar, it was flat black and bore a few war wounds and weld marks from unexected trips into the ditch. He rode 500 miles (800 km's) to be there, through pouring rain and cold, because a friend told him that they were having a get together to raise money for a worthy cause. I befriended him on the Friday night and we spoke (well, he spoke, I mostly listened in awe) over many wobbly pops and he told me many a story of 'the road' and some of his more exciting tales. After a bit, he wandered off to talk to some others and I went to sleep in my truck that night because it was too darn wet to be bothered pitching a tent, and when I awoke on Saturday morning, I crawled out of my truck feeling stiff and sore and I saw this 'old timer' fast asleep on the ground under the pick-up truck parked beside me...



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Posted on Thu, Jun 23, 2005 23:55


DakotaBlu write:
WhiskeyRich... spoken like a true biker...


Thank ya Blu, and might I say you got a different kind of "old school" feeling that I get from reading your pro and your posts. You got that old school feelin of havin been through it, standin by your man as he did the things I talked about before, the experience, the understanding, the school of hard knocks ya know. I saw your man's pic in your pro, may peace and freedom be with him. I never knew him of course, but just the feeling I get from lookin at his pic, and from readin about you, and the things you say, cause you are a product of your time with him, I can tell you are an old school biker. You have that understanding that so few REALLY get. I would have been honored to have met him, not possible of course, but in meeting you I can to some degree. I hope you can understand what Im tryin to say here. Maybe I can shorten it a bit to, I got the upmost respect for you lady and any biker would be proud to ride with you and share the memories and experiences of you and your man. Sorry this ran on and on, but I do mean it, much respect Blu, and thank you for your comments. Coming from you, I am honored.
Rich



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Posted on Thu, Jun 23, 2005 18:10

WhiskeyRich... spoken like a true biker...

  


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Posted on Thu, Jun 23, 2005 17:55

HEY BIG DRAGON .... how ya been baby? Playin nice in the sandbox?

  


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Posted on Wed, Jun 22, 2005 15:41

I think "old school" is closely intertwined with what a "biker" is (from the other thread). If you look some of ya'll have said the same things about being a biker. To me being old school is something that is hard to be if ya ain't "old". Now hear me out on this. What I mean is this, I like to think that I have the attitude and feelings and love of the open road upon two wheels and the folks that do the same to be called a true "biker". But I don't think I have the experience, the knowledge, "school of hard knocks" under my belt, to be called old school. Guys like harleydragon, oldbull, Lostboy...guys who have lived bikes all their lives. I would look rediculous standin next to these guys callin myself "old school". I am firmly in the new school corner. I love ridin but if my bike broke down on the road, I'd be prayin I was riding with the likes of some of you Old Schoolers on here. Does that make me any less a "biker" than these guys? I would so no. I have the same love for the open road, the same feelins about those I ride with that these guys do. I would do what I can for any biker on the road if he/she needed help, there isn't anything I wouldn't do for those I'm ridin with. So I think I'm as much a "biker" as any of these guys, but I ain't nowhere near being "old school bikers" like those guys. Rock on guys and keep sharin so some of us "new school" guys can keep up.
I'm sure there are other "old school" folks here, but I'm new and still checkin out profiles and posts.
Ride safe. Rich



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Posted on Tue, Jun 21, 2005 07:26

Old School?
Was it?
While riding to bike week on your H2 from Pa. you could fall behind and ride with anyone heading ther.
At B/W it was fun to hear the storys, form the guys that road from Seatle.
Cutting a gasket free hand.
Everyone waves back.
All you needed was a sleeping bag and a soft spot along the road.
You could always find someone that had papers.
Being a redneck ment you were a hard working man with short hair.
At bike week, everyone there was going to the races.
A chopper was a work of art cause the rider did all the work himself.
It's the third lap and your drum brake stopped working.
You could buy a carb kit for 3 bucks.
You could buy a carb kit.
Yuppies didn't ride bikes.
If my knee touched the pavement it was by mistake!!!
Chkn



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Posted on Fri, Apr 22, 2005 12:44

lottsa interesting comments/views on old school...mine being first and foremost:the attitude(only time gets this one)then its a certain type of class(class that only time can help ya to
appreciate...)ya got your morals and ethics(what your willin' ta do for your brothers/sisters)not just a hug,kiss,and sharing a beer,but how far your willing to go for "your" people.like the sayin' went:if i had ta' explain..ya wouldnt understand...but ya always gotta reflect on the ride(rouge had some good thoughts)
got lottsa "old school" in my garage(wont bore ya with details)still got one of the old posters in the shop that kinda hits home with me...
"know ye,this is the kingdom of kicks...bikes,wine,drugs and chicks"...it was a long time ago but it was "old school"..y'all have a great day!!!!



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Posted on Thu, Apr 14, 2005 06:46

I am not up on any of the operation of the injection , sensors , etc on the new ones but there has to be a way to make the injected models idle down ....I would think anyway. That would be a good mod to market if you can do it. I sell a lot of HD parts on ebay.In fact I sell more harley starters there than anyone.. You could do the same with that.



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Posted on Thu, Apr 14, 2005 05:53

I didn't want to belabor the point,but the Mikuni performned flawlessly.It had instant throttle response,it didn't hesitatate,it had no flat spots,and it provided fuel throughout the complete rpm range.I was also able to set it to idle like an old shovel.
I have found the FI to provide almsot all of those characteristics other than the idle.I believe the FI comes into its own when you change altitude and the system compensates for the lack of oxygen,something that carbureters cannot accomplish.I do understand "Old School" after all I tried to order a carbureted model,but so far I'm satisfied with FI.



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Posted on Wed, Apr 13, 2005 19:34

I understand that.. I stayed away from mikunis myself but the last chopper I built I bought a new revtech motor to go in it..it had a mikuni from the factory and performed great. I put one on my 88 police special a few weeks ago and was amazed. I have never had just a carb change make that much of a difference. I have not tried it cause I don't dog my scooter much but I believe that old dresser will skip the front tire off the ground now. Its a lot more responsive and stronger through the entire rpm range and idles down to hammer like a shovel.



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Posted on Wed, Apr 13, 2005 18:57

I remember a FXR/SP Low Rider Sport that I bought in '89.It was carbureted and when I started to outline the performance equipment, I found the available carbureters all lacking in performance.All the S&S's that I had used previously had a problem with bogging about 50'off the line under full throttle.After talking to several builders I decided to commit a sacrilege and install a Mikhuni.It turned out to be an extremely good performer,no regrets.



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Posted on Wed, Apr 13, 2005 07:58

I believe soldonhd is right about injection taking over the future. It is no doubt a much more efficent design of fuel delivery than the ancient carb design. As a wrench and a builder I still prefer the simpler more proven evo motor over the twin cam and still use carbs because I personally understand them better and can modify them for results I want.



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Posted on Wed, Apr 13, 2005 07:45

I'm in no hurry to buy obviously since I have had a bug for one for about forty years now, maybe later this year after I talk to some owners, I LOVE that FXDI, same color as my XX so I won't have to get a different color helmet or jacket, lol.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 19:27

don't let this keep ya'll from buying one.. HD will get better sensors no doubt.. They always take a few years to get all the bugs worked out when they make huge changes. Biggest dislike I have heard from folks with fuel injected is they won't idle down low as the carburated ones.They also had problems with cam bearings on twin cams but I think have that solved.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 18:07

HD don't tell me that.These are the first scooters that I've bought that have had fuel injection.I still wanted to order the carbureted model but was talked out of it my all my buds."Fuel injection is the delivery system of the future"."There won't be any carburated HD's in a couple of years"."Fuel injection is easier to match to any future modifications".
After I installed the Screamin Eagle stage one filter kit and the Rhineharts, I simply plugged the FI module into my computer and downloaded the correct curve and reinstalled it on my scooter and it ran well.
It was never that easy on a carbureted model.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 17:57

Wow, that sux, I was thinking about a new FXDI, figured 100 yrs was long enough to get it right, guess not. Maybe I'll take another look at that big Honda again.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 13:20

yeah jerry , all that does have its good points but one of my best buds is a "technician" (old school he would have been a mechanic) at the local HD dealership and according to him they have more problems with the sensors necessary for these improvements to operate than anything else on the new bikes.He rides an 04 twin cam and has had more go wrong with it in the last year than has gone wrong with my 88 evo police special in the 10 years I have owned it. Most of those problems have been from the sensors and other "improvements"..



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 13:05


harleydragon write:
The term "old school" as far as bikes go most is used when refering to something that resembles the older styling. Any mechanic that knows anything knows that if you put a new engine into something that the rest of it is worn out then it will still not be dependable. A smart mecanic that wants to ride an old scoot knows that every item must be rebuilt to new specs. Then it is just as dependable as one that you go to the dealership and buy new.In terms that a carpenter can understand..if you nail a new piece of plywood onto rotten 2x4's then you still have junk..Do it right or don't do it at all..




Yea I know all that but I was referring mostly to today's technology and efficiency with fuel injection and electronic ignitions, cool stuff, you know?.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 11:29

The term "old school" as far as bikes go most is used when refering to something that resembles the older styling. Any mechanic that knows anything knows that if you put a new engine into something that the rest of it is worn out then it will still not be dependable. A smart mecanic that wants to ride an old scoot knows that every item must be rebuilt to new specs. Then it is just as dependable as one that you go to the dealership and buy new.In terms that a carpenter can understand..if you nail a new piece of plywood onto rotten 2x4's then you still have junk..Do it right or don't do it at all..



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Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2005 09:11

Old Skool?
Uh Oh, I'm over it, Old Crap, obsolete junk, trash, unreliable, don't forget your toolbox and rags. Some one has got to love that crap, not me. I grew up working on all my stuff all the time, now in my "Golden Years" I just wanna push the button and go without looking back to see what fell off and how important it was.



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