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Posted on Fri, Apr 07, 2006 06:46

Everthing happens it own time, You just have to get used to the bike first and then the freeways. I've been riding for over 35 years and it scares me to be out there at times.The best thing I can tell you is take it slow and safe that's the important thing for any new rider to remember it's better to get there a little behind everyone else but at least you'll get there. And as your driving skills improve you'll feel more comfortable at higher speeds don't worry it's common with newer riders the main thing is to be safe and always be watching out for the cages out there. The trick is to get in the groove with the bike and when you do it's like nothing you've ever felt



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Posted on Sat, Jan 20, 2007 16:06

I too am a new rider and just wanted to thank all of you for your "two cents" in this forum, because it's worth a million bucks to me. After riding as a passenger for years, I got tired of waiting for someone to give me a ride. Riding alone made me real nervous (and it's not as much fun), but when I found myself waiting for someone to ride with I was back to square one. So I venture out on my own, a little further every ride and feel more confident each time. Thanks again.



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Posted on Sat, Jul 15, 2006 07:00

I am in the process of buying my first bike, and the sales guy offerred to have it delivered, because he knew my experience of solo riding is limited to the training course. I would suggest you find out if that would be an option for you, since you would feel more comfortable getting a feel for it in your own neighborhood.

I can take back roads to get home, so I plan on doing that. I want to be comfortable on the bike before I have to start navigating the hills and turns in my neighborhood, while avoiding the caged yuppies who ignore all traffic laws once they turn into the development.



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Posted on Mon, Jun 05, 2006 18:18

Being a race instructor I run into 18yr olds with 360lb 180hp sportbikes and no fear.The hardest thing for them is restraint and repetition,and getting them to understand that to go fast you must first learn to go slow.They must learn to relax and let the bike do the work,and not to have the death grip on the throttle.Their biggest obstacle is that they try to muscle the bike and over correct(to much brake/throttle).
So relax,be smooth and be aware of you surroundings.



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Posted on Thu, Jun 01, 2006 08:17

MySugar write:
I too took the motorcycle safety course and have not yet bought a bike because for one - I would be too terrified to ride it home on the freeway and, where I live, in order to get someplace quiet to ride, the freeway is the only way.

I do have a coupla questions for anyone wishing/able to answer. I'd like to get a Harley - is it better to get a new one (so you know how it's been broken in) or a used one? Do they REALLY spend all their time in the shop? Also - it is better to start off with the biggest bike you can handle or a smaller one (like a sportster) til ya get the hang of riding?

A new Harley can be a very intimidating machine if you've never riden a bike before at all. Myself, I wouldn't suggest to anyone that they go out and buy the biggest one they could sling there leg over right away by any means. If you've never ridden a bike before, start out with something smaller and lighter. Honda makes an excellent line of bikes in the V-twin line that are perfect for new riders called the Shadow. I would suggest something around a 750cc range, and if you can find one, get a used one. That way if you drop it, no biggy, and 750cc is a good size for not only getting down the back roads, but it'll carry you on the freeway as well with plenty of power. In addition to that, the Shadow's seat heigth I think you'll find a little more comfortable than a Sporty (although lowering kits can be had for the Sporty's). After you've ridden the Shadow for a year or so, then sling a leg over a Harley, and I can almost garentee you that the Harley won't seem quite as big and intimidateing after that.

I've ridden my Harley across ten states with no problems what so ever, and the only time it spends in the shop is when I take it in to have upgrades installed that I don't have the tools or the facilities to install myself.

As far as getting up on the slab goes. Find some friends to ride with for a while. Having them around will provide a feeling of security, and if something does happen they're close by. Also, pick times to ride when traffic is at it's lowest, early morning weekends, late night, etc. With less cages around, less to intimidate you and you can consintrate on getting to know the bike.

Best of luck to you, and Congradulations!

  


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Posted on Thu, Jun 01, 2006 06:13

MySugar write:
I too took the motorcycle safety course and have not yet bought a bike because for one - I would be too terrified to ride it home on the freeway and, where I live, in order to get someplace quiet to ride, the freeway is the only way.

I do have a coupla questions for anyone wishing/able to answer. I'd like to get a Harley - is it better to get a new one (so you know how it's been broken in) or a used one? Do they REALLY spend all their time in the shop? Also - it is better to start off with the biggest bike you can handle or a smaller one (like a sportster) til ya get the hang of riding?

For whatever its worth, my opinion is #1 If you can afford a new one buy new for the warranty and extended warranty... well worth the lack of headaches!!

#2 A sportster really is not the best bike to learn on they sit high and are not the best handling bikes on the road. I suggest that you learn on whatever you are gonna want to ride. No matter what you learn on.. you will learn everything new on every bike you ride because they are all different. Like anything else once you do it your fears will subside and you will be just fine.

Others have different opinions.. but that one is mine.

Ride safe!

  


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Posted on Wed, May 31, 2006 19:38

I too took the motorcycle safety course and have not yet bought a bike because for one - I would be too terrified to ride it home on the freeway and, where I live, in order to get someplace quiet to ride, the freeway is the only way.

I do have a coupla questions for anyone wishing/able to answer. I'd like to get a Harley - is it better to get a new one (so you know how it's been broken in) or a used one? Do they REALLY spend all their time in the shop? Also - it is better to start off with the biggest bike you can handle or a smaller one (like a sportster) til ya get the hang of riding?

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Posted on Fri, Apr 21, 2006 12:54

Proficient Motorcycling is an entertaing read and is available from Amazon.



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Posted on Fri, Apr 21, 2006 11:04

wnjbill write:
Well I've had the pleasure of helping a few new riders get going and if I can offer up my advice, I'd have to say.

1. Don't ride alone until you're comfortable doing it. It's always good to have someone there to cheer you on and give you advise as needed. And not to jinx you or anything, but it's also nice to have someone there to help you pick up your bike if you drop it at a red light or stop sign.

2. Don't ride with someone who is impatient. Have co-riders follow you. This will allow you to keep a comfortable distance between you and whatever is in front of you and it will also keep the cagers off of your tail.

3. Do what you can to eliminate wind and noise. Use a shield on your helmet and use earplugs. Sometimes wind and noise make it feel as though you are going faster then you really are.

4. Always keep aware of your surroundings and ride as though you're the only intelligent person on the road.

5. Last but not least, never do anything that you are not comfortable doing. Eventually you'll be able rip through the twisties and run through the gears like a pro. But until you're comfortable with it, take your time.

Hope that helps.


thnx for all the riding you have done with me Bill--take his advice
it is nice knowing someone has your back



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Posted on Mon, Apr 17, 2006 20:05

unblonde wrote:
I'm just so impatient and want to be a great rider instantly!!

Two excellent books - Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well

AND

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Guide To Motorcycling Excellence: Skills, Knowledge, and Strategies For Riding Right



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Posted on Fri, Apr 14, 2006 19:06

Cinderella write:
justyforya write:
Are you sure you aren't a blonde? ............ and don't give up and blonde out.


You got a problem with blondes?
Maybe I'll have a problem with sportbikers.


About the blonde thing, geez I was just kidding ... I'm a dirty blonde myself... and yeah, I've blonde out a few times; like the time I drop a bike (years ago) pick it up, and dumped it on the other side... A great blonde moment I had.

Oh PS... Since you are having problems picking your bike up, take my advise: if you drop your bike on the rightside put the side stand down before you pick it up.

For leftside drops, you probably are safer sitting on the bike (after you get it up) before putting the side stand down.



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Posted on Tue, Apr 11, 2006 21:58

stillme67 write:
DirtyBikers4Eva write:

Again, ride and ride some more and when you are done, ride some more still!! That is what will build your confidence!!


ha! she said "ride some more Still"
just kidding...

anyway, it's good advice but i would add that u need to quit looking at your speedometer. if u go too fast the cops will stop u and let you know about it. find a small section of highway and hop on and then hop off at the next exit. and find a repitious route to travel. ride it by yourself. you won't become comfortable with everything all at once so just go at your own pace. just go a bit further each time. and if you need to calm yourself down, sing. nobody will be able to hear ya. i used to do it before all my races... still do.


WOW... that must sound real great...ha ha ha... We wanna hear you singin Bill!! What song??



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Posted on Tue, Apr 11, 2006 11:32

midnightrider71 write:
Everthing happens it own time, You just have to get used to the bike first and then the freeways. I've been riding for over 35 years and it scares me to be out there at times.The best thing I can tell you is take it slow and safe that's the important thing for any new rider to remember it's better to get there a little behind everyone else but at least you'll get there. And as your driving skills improve you'll feel more comfortable at higher speeds don't worry it's common with newer riders the main thing is to be safe and always be watching out for the cages out there. The trick is to get in the groove with the bike and when you do it's like nothing you've ever felt


Good advice Mid,
Like you I've been riding forever and have owned 12 bikes over the years, yet will still get scared at times out there. Made a run from Corpus Christi to Dallas Tx. and back this week.. about 1000 miles total with the side trips I took. Most of it was great, but had a moment of the "What am I doing here's" between Waxahatchie and Waco!

My advice is same as your's. Take it at your own pace, that pace will stepup before you know it.



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Posted on Mon, Apr 10, 2006 22:32

"DON'T ride alone!!!. You're too new. I don't care if you took the safety course or not."

I disagree. Especially, if this would force you to only ride with other people (even slightly insensitive) to your concerns, or skill level.
Beside's, when Solo, you only have yourself to think about and that help's the focus.

"You have a lot of men here posting to you and a lot of good info."

Ironic, no?
One's gender has very little to do with the content or quality of the advise, Heck, I am a man and look at my post?

"But I'm talking as you being a new rider. Take it slow. "

This last sentence made me reread what I wrote, and thus this addendum:

I am not suggesting you need, should, or would be better off, by pushing the limits of your comfort zone. Simply that if you want to speed up the process you'll have to take bigger risks or ride day and night for extended periods of time.
Actually, I kinda regret saying any of this as I don't know how "new" you actually are.

One good thing about getting used to speed on highways verse's country roads is the reduced odds of having a dog jump out from behind a bush, hellbent on a beeline for your front tire. That being said, avoiding the rabid-dog-from-nowhere builds confidence faster then 300 miles on any barrin stretch of ribbon.

The posters last sentence clipped here is probably right on the mark.

"Once you become more comfortable with your bike, the rest will come including speed."

Could be you'll also have to curb your impulsive nature?

DD



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Posted on Mon, Apr 10, 2006 11:01


unblonde write:
Hi Im kinda new to this site and actually very new to riding a bike. I recently took the motorcycle safety course and bought a bike. Its a used one but ive been fixing it up. Nice little Yamaha Virago xv750. I am sort of having a problem getting used to the speed on the freeway. I would appreciate any help or suggestions on what I can do to relax and get confident when i ride past about 55mph.Also is it better to learn with another rider or better solo? I did ride once with a friend but he had a hard time going slow, im sure i tested his patience but he was a trooper thru the whole experience. This is something I really want to do but im still so damn scared of the freeway!(I know its corny but heres my Bikerkiss pic)



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Posted on Mon, Apr 10, 2006 07:03

DirtyBikers4Eva write:

Again, ride and ride some more and when you are done, ride some more still!! That is what will build your confidence!!


ha! she said "ride some more Still"
just kidding...

anyway, it's good advice but i would add that u need to quit looking at your speedometer. if u go too fast the cops will stop u and let you know about it. find a small section of highway and hop on and then hop off at the next exit. and find a repitious route to travel. ride it by yourself. you won't become comfortable with everything all at once so just go at your own pace. just go a bit further each time. and if you need to calm yourself down, sing. nobody will be able to hear ya. i used to do it before all my races... still do.



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Posted on Mon, Apr 10, 2006 03:00

unblonde write:
Hi Im kinda new to this site and actually very new to riding a bike. I recently took the motorcycle safety course and bought a bike. Its a used one but ive been fixing it up. Nice little Yamaha Virago xv750. I am sort of having a problem getting used to the speed on the freeway. I would appreciate any help or suggestions on what I can do to relax and get confident when i ride past about 55mph.Also is it better to learn with another rider or better solo? I did ride once with a friend but he had a hard time going slow, im sure i tested his patience but he was a trooper thru the whole experience. This is something I really want to do but im still so damn scared of the freeway!(I know its corny but heres my Bikerkiss pic)

firstly get used to your bikeride it as often as you can become one with it to me it doesnt matter what the bike is or the size of it they are only as good as the person riding them so get used to the bike at frst ride with a couple of friends take trips out have fun and relax but remember your the only sane person on the road and everyone else is insane when you have got used to the bike and learnt to relax on it the speed will come its all to easy for people to just just on them open them up then find just ahead o them a bend they didnt expect and here in the uk there are many bends i see it all to often the young kids that just dont know there bikes i have three young people now that have all past there basic training and all come of there bikes two havent got them back on the road so i have told them i will ride with them till they can stay on them lol no really just so they have an idea as to when to speed up and when to slow down sometimes this is easier to learn if you ride with someone that knows what they are doing so take it easy get to know your bike and i wish you many happy biking years ahead take care and ride free



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Posted on Sun, Apr 09, 2006 09:23

treecutter write:
Howdy

Congradulatioms! Part of the thrill of a motorcycle for me is that I get to face my fears!And push them!And embrace them.
And there are good days and bad days, and I will almost always avoid 'freeway' or 4 liner , I rode a lot of years around the SF bay area and you couldn't avoid the highways...always distrust the other driver!!!!
It gets better with miles under your belt...and as you get used to the bike , you will trust it and your self more!
Havefun!

We agree we Treecutter, you don't get over your fears unless you face them. Going on the busy highways is the only way you will get over being nervous on them. Riding on side streets will only make you comfortable riding on side streets. Riding alone helps you build confidence in yourself and your abilities. Unless you intend to ALWAYS ride with others then you need to ride by yourself sometimes. Riding slow will only keep you comfortable riding slow. The way to get comfortable in all situations is to put yourself in them and stay calm and never be afraid to pull over or stop and regroup. No matter where you ride you can Always simply pull over and regroup or let others pass and start all over again.

Again, ride and ride some more and when you are done, ride some more still!! That is what will build your confidence!!



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Posted on Sat, Apr 08, 2006 19:47

Sweetie, you have a easy bike. I have a virago 1100 and that is the first bike I ever rode on. If I can handle a big bike like that, so can you. DON'T ride alone!!!. You're too new. I don't care if you took the safety course or not. You have a lot of men here posting to you and a lot of good info. But I'm talking as you being a new rider. Take it slow. your girl can handle turns great. Don't assume someone is being impatient with you. you will only get yourself tensed up more. you are concentrating on you, don't worry about whose with you. If they know you are new, then they've been where you have themselves. Stay off the crowded roadways for a little while till you get a good handle on your bike. Your comfort level is a major thing. Once you become more comfortable with your bike, the rest will come including speed. you're doing great I'm sure. wish you lived closer, we could ride. You go girl!!

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Posted on Sat, Apr 08, 2006 08:32

I was lucky that I had good a teacher when I started riding. If I had anything else to offer I would suggest counrty roads. You can speed up and slow down when you want and I think the more miles you get on the more you will relax. My first bike was a super glide and I can remember being so scared the night before I picked it up. When I got on it, it seemed to stear itself and after a while I lost that "Death Grip". I still get it when I'm in the city having to ride a little more defensive.
Spyder